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Dr. Mark Zuber, D.C.

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Personal Injury Protection (PIP) and Auto Accidents

By | Auto Injury, Neck Pain, Uncategorized | No Comments

Car crashes are all too common in the DFW area.  Driver inattention, impatience, and sometimes just a mistake can change a person’s whole world, sometimes permanently.  Even in low speed collisions, soft tissue injuries are common.  If they are left untreated, they will lead to scar tissue formation.  Depending on the injury location, the scar tissue can cause nerves to get trapped, discs to weaken and even brain damage (scarring in the brain).

Dr. Zuber has treated car accident injuries for over 20 years.  He is certified in Whiplash Injury Biomechanics and Traumatology through Dr. Art Croft, from the Spine Research Institute.  Dr. Zuber uses multiple soft tissue techniques that help minimize scar tissue.  This combined with chiropractic manipulation is very effective at treating these types of injuries.

PIP & AUTO INSURANCE

Navigating auto crashes with insurance carriers can be tricky as well.  If another person is found at fault, that car’s insurance typically will not pay for your treatment.  This can make finding treatment difficult.  Dr. Zuber is typically able to take these cases when others won’t.  Oftentimes, a car policy will have a Personal Injury Protection (PIP) provision.  Texas requires that every driver is offered at least $2,500 of PIP insurance, but drivers can typically obtain coverage for $5,000 or $10,000 to get additional financial protection. Personal injury protection coverage in Texas provides coverage for you and your vehicle’s passengers if there are injuries due to a car accident, no matter which party was at-fault for the collision. PIP covers treatment as you go, much like health insurance.  It also covers things like lost wages, domestic assistance (if warranted), etc.

If you are involved in a motor vehicle collision, seek medical attention quickly.  With timely care, Frisco car accident chiropractor Dr. Mark Zuber will help you to recover from your auto injury.

Yours in health,

M. Zuber, D.C., Frisco’s Sports Chiropractor

Meet Dr. Zuber

Creating a Manageable Daily Meditation Practice

By | Health, Uncategorized | No Comments

By Guest Blogger Julie Euseppi, Euseppi Mind Body

 

There are many benefits to sustaining a regular mediation practice- decreased stress, increased focus, improved sleep, increased self-control, improvements in blood pressure, metabolism, and heart rate. With all of these benefits, it can still feel daunting.

Beginning a meditation practice does not have to be daunting nor does it have to be time consuming. A study from Waterloo University found just 10 minutes of mediation can help anxious people have better focus. Just 10 minutes was particularly effective if you tend to have repetitive, anxious thoughts, which I would venture to guess we all do with the pandemic, the changes and uncertainty the virus has brought with it.

Think of starting a meditation practice as if you are teaching a child to brush their teeth. In this case you are learning to floss the mind of worry. This attitude helps you to conceptualize the daily need for daily mental health.

Our inner child and monkey mind is quite resistant to even a 10-minute practice so we want to reinforce and build skill over time. We are rewiring our brains and laying down new neural pathways, that takes time and patience. So, start out small, very small with a 2-minute practice and build one minute each day.  Just think in 9 days you will have achieved 10-minutes! Yay!

In order build a platform for success, set a time each day often morning or evening is best. I set a reminder on my phone that goes off at the same time each day. Now what to focus on?  Well it just so happens that we have our own natural metronome. It is our breath. We can focus on the inhalation and the exhalation. How the breath fills the body on the inhalation and how the body condenses on the exhalation. Noticing how it travels through the body and the path it takes. We sense the coolness of air as it enters the nostrils even following the coolness down the nasal pathways and the warmth as it exits. When my mind wanders and I am down some rabbit hole, I can always just turn back to my breath. Every time I wake up from my mind wandering and I turn back, I have been successful in refocusing and I am right back to the present moment.

Remember learning meditation is about building the muscle of focus and attention, release the goal of stillness, we are learning to return to our practice and that building the muscle of remaining present.

Try it for 1 week and then build your practice to 2 weeks, and then to 21 days, and pretty soon you will have set into motion like brushing your teeth a daily practice of meditation. You can take it past 10 minutes or just keep it there. Remember you get the same benefits per the study. If you fall off the boat start again with 2 minutes and build again.

Like any habit we are trying to change or implement, it is made easier with the support of others, so get the whole family involved! Or create a meditation challenge with a friend or friends. Start today and let me know how it goes!

Julie Euseppi LCSW

Euseppi Mind Body

Julie Euseppi, LCSW, trauma, yoga, meditation, therapy

Julie Euseppi, LCSW

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

frisco sports chiropractor

COVID-19 and FightDoc

By | Chiropractic, Health | No Comments

Chiropractic physicians are considered “essential” care during this time of social distancing. Our office will be open during limited office hours. Please know that your health and wellness has always been our priority. The Zuber Crew is taking all the necessary precautions:

• Completely sanitizing between patients
• Spreading out appointments so there is little to no interaction between patients
• All patients are being asked to use hand sanitizer when they enter

Keep in mind that most health plans cover Telehealth consultations. Obviously adjustments can’t happen virtually, but in a Telehealth consultation Dr. Zuber can help you to determine if what you are experiencing might be alleviated by at-home exercises and give you instruction and information that can help you get some relief without leaving your home. Telehealth consultations for existing patients includes range of motion evaluations, rehab, nutrition counseling and health coaching. Please message us for more information or to schedule a Telehealth visit.

If you have sustained ANY musculoskeletal injury– not just back or neck, but also leg, shoulder, hips, etc– avoid emergency rooms, which would tax an already-overly burdened system and may not even be able to serve you. Dr. Zuber will assess your injury, order any necessary MRI or X-rays and direct or manage your treatment.

 

Let us know how we can help; we’re all in this together.

Chiropractor Frisco Sport Injury

Runners Self Defense Seminar

By | Health, Sports, Uncategorized | No Comments

This past weekend was our first Self Defender seminar with Frisco Running Club. Runners from Frisco and other local areas joined us at Rockstar Martial Arts in Prosper/ Windsong Ranch to learn hands on techniques for escaping an attack. Our instructors taught them how to release from grabs and chokes, how to break out of headlocks, to escape from being pinned down and many more valuable techniques.

Self Defense Chiropractor Sports Injury Frisco
Self Defense Chiropractor Sports Injury Frisco
Sleep ergonomics frisco chiropractor 75034

Sleep Ergonomics

By | Chiropractic, Health, Neck Pain | No Comments

“Sleep ergonomics” refers to our postures and positions during sleep–which either help us rest safely and comfortably or stress joints to the point that we wake up with more aches and pains than we fell asleep with. Sleeping positions matter. Poor-quality sleep is proven to negatively affect overall health. Here are some great tips for ergonomic sleeping from the American Chiropractic Association.

Sleeping Positions to Reduce Back Pain

It is possible and desirable to take strain off your back by making simple changes in sleeping posture. The healthiest sleeping position is on your side. If that’s how you sleep, draw your legs up slightly toward your chest and put a pillow between your legs. Some people even use a full-length body pillow to help maintain balance. Try not to put weight on your arms. This causes circulatory problems and a related pins-and-needles sensation. Instead, try crossing them in a braced position.

If you sleep on your back, it is best to place a pillow under your knees to help maintain the normal lower back curvature. You might try placing a small rolled towel under the small of the back for more support. Be aware that sleeping on your stomach is generally bad for your back. In this position, the cervical spine undergoes considerable strain, which can cause nerve compression, muscular imbalance and muscle pain. If you can’t sleep any other way, reduce the strain on your back by placing a pillow under your pelvis and lower abdomen. Also place a pillow under your head if it doesn’t cause back strain. Otherwise, try sleeping without a head pillow.

Mattresses and Pillows

Your mattress and pillow should support your body in its natural position, allowing it to rest and recover from the day’s activities. The best mattresses are designed to conform to the spine’s natural curve and keep the spine in alignment. Some sleep experts recommend supportive memory foam mattresses for this purpose.

Maintain Your Mattress

Remember to turn your mattress over every few months. If possible, replace the mattress after five to seven years of regular use. If you feel springs or bumps beneath the surface when you’re lying on the bed, or you and your partner unintentionally roll toward the middle of the bed, it’s time to go shopping for a new mattress. A worn-out mattress can reduce the quality of sleep and make back problems worse. You may also find that the mattress is to blame for insomnia if you notice yourself sleeping better in another bed—in a hotel, for example.

Pillows Matter

An ergonomic pillow is designed to accommodate the user’s sleeping position and to minimize any associated tension that may result from prolonged time spent in one position. Ergonomic pillows are shaped differently from regular pillows. They are often made of foam or similar form-retaining material that offers greater support. Most ergonomic pillows are used for sleep, although some are used for lower back support while sitting. They vary in size from small neck pillows used for long car trips or flights to very large full-body pillows, meant to cradle the entire body during sleep. A healthful pillow is designed to keep the spine in natural alignment, which minimizes stress on the body. Most people do not maintain neutral positions while they sleep. This creates tension at problem spots like the neck and the lower back, resulting in pain in either or both of these areas. An ergonomic pillow can often correct such problems.

A pillow of the wrong size can cause or aggravate neck and shoulder problems. When you sleep on your side, the pillow should fill the space between the head and mattress so that the cervical spine is in line with, and an extension of, the spine. The pillow should support the head, neck and shoulders and adapt to the contours of these areas. This will optimize your sleeping position throughout the night. A pillow also should be hypoallergenic.

frisco sports chiropractor rocktape endurance athlete

RockTape

By | Uncategorized | No Comments

RockTape is the world’s best kinesiology tape. It can be used to treat sports and non-sports injuries, including shin splints, plantar fasciitis, runner’s knee and back pain. RockTape microscopically lifts the skin away from the muscle and fascia below, creating a decompressive effect. Stretchier, stickier and stronger than the competition, RockTape is engineered to meet the demands of endurance athletes like runners, swimmers and cyclists. Unlike other products, RockTape can be used both to apply compression to promote recovery, or decompression to relieve pain and swelling.

RockTape helps:

  • Enhance performance
  • Prevent fatigue
  • Promote circulation
  • Remove lactic acid

 

How It Works

Turns down the volume on pain*

More specifically, it runs interference on pain*. Ever whack your shin and rub it, and suddenly realize you feel better? RockTape on the skin can interfere with pain*ful signals which are directed to the brain.

When the signals arriving to the brain are altered, it does not produce the sensation of pain*. When kinesiology tape is properly applied, many of our customers call it “magic” or think that it fixed their injury instantly. In fact, it helps to change how your body interprets pain*, turning down the pain* “volume” that your body hears.

Decompresses swelling and inflammation

When RockTape is applied to the skin, it has a microscopic lifting effect underneath the skin and between the many layers. This allows the by-products created by inflammation to be removed more quickly.

Delays fatigue

Research has shown that RockTape on skin can attenuate muscle fatigue. In rehab, this is very important, not only for the parts of your body that are currently hurting, but also for the surrounding areas as they help to pick up the slack for muscles that are currently not working well.

Normalizes muscle tone

When someone is injured, fatigued, sick, or inflamed, the symphony of muscle action that normally takes place with great accuracy often falls out of tune. This can happen all over the body. For instance, research has shown that people who sprain their ankle tend to have altered activity of their hip muscle as a result. RockTape helps bring dormant muscle back to life and help calm down the overactive muscles. It helps your body coordinate movement as if it weren’t hurt, hence allowing it to heal properly.

Distributes physical stress

Unlike conventional taping, which prevents movement – RockTape allows full movement of a taped area.  Through elastic properties and quick recoil, RockTape can help distribute forces to other nearby areas through the fascia, ligaments, and even bones.

If you want an edge on your upcoming competition or performance, sports chiropractor Dr. Mark Zuber can RockTape you to go stronger, longer.

Yours in health,

M. Zuber, D.C., Frisco’s Sports Chiropractor

Meet Dr. Zuber

Auto Injury Frisco Chiropractor

Seat Belts Save Lives

By | Auto Injury, Back Pain, Chiropractic, Neck Pain | No Comments

One of the safest choices drivers and passengers can make is to buckle up. Many Americans understand the lifesaving value of the seat belt – the national use rate was at 89.6% in 2018 according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Seat belt use in passenger vehicles saved an estimated 14,955 lives in 2017. Understand the potentially fatal consequences of not wearing a seat belt and learn what you can do to make sure you and your family are properly buckled up every time.

Preventing Auto Injuries

1. Buckling up helps keep you safe and secure inside your vehicle, whereas not buckling up can result in being totally ejected from the vehicle in a crash, which is almost always deadly.

2. Air bags are not enough to protect you; in fact, the force of an air bag can seriously injure or even kill you if you’re not buckled up.

3. Improperly wearing a seat belt, such as putting the strap below your arm, puts you and your children at risk in a crash.

The Benefits of Buckling:

  • If you buckle up in the front seat of a passenger car, you can reduce your risk of moderate to critical injury (including spine and neck injury) by 50%
  • If you buckle up in a light truck, you can reduce your risk of moderate to critical injury (including spine and neck injury) by 65% (NHTSA, 1984)

Auto Injury Frisco Chiropractic

What Should I Do if I Am Involved in a Crash?

Seek immediate medical attention, even if you think you are not injured, regardless of whether you’re the driver or passenger. With timely care, Dr. Zuber will help you to recover from your auto injury.

Yours in health,

M. Zuber, D.C., Frisco’s Sports and Auto Injury Chiropractor

Heart Health Month Frisco Sports Chiropractor

February Is Heart Health Month

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When it comes to your heart, what you eat matters. Follow these tips from HealthFinder.gov for heart-healthy eating:

  1. Eat less saturated fats. Cut back on fatty meats, high-fat dairy, cakes, cookies, and butter. This includes pizza, burgers, and foods with creamy sauce or gravy.
  2. Cut down on sodium (salt). Read the Nutrition Facts label and choose foods that are lower in sodium. Look for the low-sodium or “no salt added” types of canned soups, vegetables, packaged meals, snack foods, and lunch meats.
  3. Get more fiber. Eat vegetables, fruits, and whole grains to add fiber to your diet.

Go fish

The American Heart Association recommends eating fish (particularly fatty fish) at least two times (two servings) a week. Each serving is 3.5 ounce cooked, or about ¾ cup of flaked fish. Fatty fish like salmon, mackerel, herring, lake trout, sardines and albacore tuna are high in omega-3 fatty acids.

Increasing omega-3 fatty acid consumption through foods is preferable. However, those with coronary artery disease, may not get enough omega-3 by diet alone. These people may want to talk to their doctor about supplements. And for those with high triglycerides, even larger doses could help.

Patients taking more than 3 grams of omega-3 fatty acids from capsules should do so only under a physician’s care. High intakes could cause excessive bleeding in some people.

Eating fish, is there a catch?

Some types of fish may contain high levels of mercury, PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls), dioxins and other environmental contaminants. Levels of these substances are generally highest in older, larger, predatory fish and marine mammals.

The benefits and risks of eating fish vary depending on a person’s stage of life.

  • Children and pregnant women are advised by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to avoid eating those fish with the potential for the highest level of mercury contamination (e.g., shark, swordfish, king mackerel or tilefish); to eat up to 12 ounces (two average meals) per week of a variety of fish and shellfish that are lower in mercury (e.g., canned light tuna, salmon, pollock, catfish); and check local advisories about the safety of fish caught by family and friends in local lakes, rivers and coastal areas.
  • For middle-aged and older men and postmenopausal women, the benefits of fish consumption far outweigh the potential risks when the amount of fish are eaten is within the recommendations established by the FDA and Environmental Protection Agency.
  • Eating a variety of fish will help minimize any potentially adverse effects due to environmental pollutants.

Five of the most commonly eaten fish or shellfish that are low in mercury are shrimp, canned light tuna, salmon, pollock, and catfish. Avoid eating shark, swordfish, king Mackerel, or tilefish because they contain high levels of mercury.

Dr. Mark Zuber
8765 Stockard Drive, Suite 303, Frisco TX 75034

 

(972) 733-0915